Fish Warden Training for Qoliqoli Cokovata community fishers | WWF

Fish Warden Training for Qoliqoli Cokovata community fishers



Posted on 25 November 2020
Community participants from Qoliqoli Cokovata during the Fish Warden training at Sasa village,Macuata.
© WWF-Pacific Emosi Cabealawa
28 community fishers from Qoliqoli Cokovata which includes the districts of Sasa, Macuata, Dreketi and Mali were part of a Fish Warden training that was organized by the Ministry of Fisheries.

The three day workshop that was held at Sasa village in Macuata, enabled community fishers to better understand their roles and responsibilities as Fish Wardens under the Fisheries Management Act and also protect their fishing grounds from illegal fishing activities, especially for community fishers who depend on small scale fishing income.

WWF-Pacific’s Community Development officer Metui Tokece said the participants have learnt the importance of how to sustainably manage marine resources within their traditional fishing grounds.

He added that during discussions, much  emphasis had been placed  on the critical role Fish Wardens play in keeping a check on the management of their fisheries,  since it involves prevention, detection and enforcement of the provisions within the Fisheries Act,the Seasonal Species restriction regulation and the Offshore Fisheries Management Act 2012.

The forum was timely given that it provided an opportunity for the team from the Ministry of Fisheries to consult with Fish Wardens and other stakeholders in getting their inputs into key aspects  of enforcement and compliance especially on the need  to protect certain species from over fishing such as Turtles, Bech-de-mer, Giant clams, Bumphead Parrot Fish and Hump head Wrasse (Varivoce).

Support towards enabling participants in being part of the Fish Warden training was provided by WWF-Netherlands.
 
Community participants from Qoliqoli Cokovata during the Fish Warden training at Sasa village,Macuata.
© WWF-Pacific Emosi Cabealawa Enlarge
Fish Warden Training at Sasa village. Macuata.
© WWF-Pacific Emosi Cabealawa Enlarge