Mt Korobaba Hike: July 2016 | WWF

Mt Korobaba Hike: July 2016



Posted on 01 August 2016
The track up the mountain proved varied in its steepness and scenery, challenging but exciting.
© WWF-Pacific Volunteers
The Baby Pandas assembled outside the Flea Market to the rising of another perfect Suva dawn, cool, calm and only slightly cloudy. A short bus ride took them outside Suva and through Lami to the foot of Mount Korobaba, where more Pandas joined the larger group.

The track up the mountain proved varied in its steepness and scenery, challenging but exciting. Fallen logs made good resting spots along the track, and a running waterfall and stream offered a refreshing place to wash off the dirt. Tomasi, who joined us late and ran the length of the track, dove straight into the pool and lay on his back in the cool water before continuing his lone sprint to the top.

Other groups were also taking advantage of the track and friendly competition started as groups passed each other time and again.

The track steepened to a near vertical climb, only possible with the help of the protruding roots; a wooden ladder growing out of the mountain itself. With the view of the top blocked by trees, the first glimpse of completion was the sun as the canopy cleared away.

The group competition turned to support, clapping and cheering as each new person cleared the final climb. Tired but exuberant the teams found spots on the grass to sit, share food, drink water and look out over the height they had accomplished.

The view from the top was stunning. At only 9:30 in the morning, the sun glistened off the harbour. People looked over Suva and the surrounding landscape and noted what landmarks and buildings they could see, admired the reef break and talked about events which had changed this environment. Others turned to look the other direction and spoke of the other peaks and the challenges they present.

Jope turned his music on as everyone chatted, sat and recovered from the hike.

When it was time to descend, bags were handed around for rubbish collection. We started at the peak and quickly filled several with discarded plastic food packets and bottles. Working our way back down the steep track was harder, but more bags were filled despite the difficulty. Some rubbish was deemed too dangerous to collect, which had been thrown off the path onto the sheer forested slope of the mountain. Observers from the other groups noticed this effort and praised the initiative.

An industrial skip to dispose of the bags, one short bus ride back to Suva and the day was done. The  Panda’s said their goodbyes and dispersed into the crowd.

Until next time.
The track up the mountain proved varied in its steepness and scenery, challenging but exciting.
© WWF-Pacific Volunteers Enlarge
Fallen logs made good resting spots along the track
© WWF-Pacific Volunteers Enlarge
The view from the top was stunning.
© WWF-Pacific Volunteers Enlarge
When it was time to descend, bags were handed around for rubbish collection. We started at the peak and quickly filled several with discarded plastic food packets and bottles.
© WWF-Pacific Volunteers Enlarge