Fiji receives recertification for Albacore and Yellowfin long line tuna fishery | WWF

Fiji receives recertification for Albacore and Yellowfin long line tuna fishery



Posted on 26 January 2018
Offloading Albacore Tuna at Solander Jetty, Fiji.
© WWF-Pacific / Patricia Mallam
Fiji’s Albacore and Yellowfin long line fishery recertification to the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) Fishery Standard will go a long way in improving the industry’s sustainability.

This is after Fiji received recertification for the two fish tuna species earlier this week from the MSC.

WWF-Pacific’s sustainable fisheries and seafood programme manager, Duncan Williams says the accreditation is a big win for Fiji’s off-shore fisheries.

“WWF congratulates members of the Fiji Fishing Industry Association for achieving recertification of its Albacore and the inclusion now of the Yellowfin long line tuna fisheries under the MSC banner.”

“This recertification will go a long way to improving the sustainability of tuna fisheries within and beyond the exclusive economic zone of Fiji and safeguard livelihoods of those that are directly and indirectly dependent on the tuna fisheries sector in Fiji and across the Southern Pacific” said Williams.

Williams added WWF would carry on working with Fiji’s Tuna Industry, the Ministry of Fisheries and other stakeholders to continue to improve the Tuna fisheries so that it meets the highest sustainability standards and the benefits from the fishery are reaped by Fijians well into the future.

According to a MSC statement, the recertification adds Yellowfin as a certified species to the previously certified catches of albacore and also extends the area of the fishery beyond Fiji’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) to include high seas pockets bordering the EEZ.

“Congratulations to the Fiji Fishing Industry Association for their continued commitment and leadership in ensuring the sustainability of local fish stocks and the greater marine environment.”

“Beyond ocean health, the eco-labelling and traceability components of MSC certification bring social and economic benefits to Fijians, who depend on tuna as an important resource. The recertification builds on Fiji’s commitment made last year at the first United Nations Ocean Conference to have 75% of all long line vessels MSC certified,” said Anne Gabriel, the Oceania Program Director for the MSC.

“The Fiji Fishing Industry is delighted that our surface line fishery has received recertification under the MSC.  We were the first surface tuna long line industry in the world to be accredited and the reassessment is a matter of pride for Fiji.   We would like to thank all those, including the Fiji Ministry of Fisheries, who assisted us through the process,” added Anare Raiwalui, Executive Officer of the Fiji Fishing Industry Association.

The MSC Fisheries Standard is designed to assess if a fishery is well-managed and sustainable. It has been developed in consultation with scientists, the fishing industry and conservation groups. It reflects the most up to date understanding of internationally accepted fisheries science and best practice management.

Certification to the MSC Fisheries Standard is voluntary and is open to all fisheries involved in the wild-capture of marine or freshwater organisms. This includes most types of fish and shellfish, of any size, type or location.
 
Offloading Albacore Tuna at Solander Jetty, Fiji.
© WWF-Pacific / Patricia Mallam Enlarge
Offloading of Albacore Tuna at Solander Jetty, Fiji
© WWF-Pacific / Patricia Mallam Enlarge
Solander Processing Plant
© WWF-Pacific / Patricia Mallam Enlarge